Election Reflections

Well, there you have it, folks. America has decided. The results are in (well, except for the Stuart Smalley Al Franken thing)…

Anyway, on a much more serious note…

I was disappointed with last nights results. 

No one can doubt that it was a historical night, that — if you can put the specific candidate and ALL the issues aside (which is really, really, REALLY hard for me to do, but I tried) — you must admit was monumental in many ways. An African-American is going to be president. A person who 50 years ago would have held very limited rights and privileges in our nation has now been elected it’s president. I heard this morning that in January he will be sworn in on steps that were built by slaves. Wow. In and of itself, ALL OTHER ISSUES ASIDE, this is a cool thing.

I watched the multitudes welcome him in Grant Park last night. It was a very moving scene, in many ways — and I SO wanted to be able to be more excited about it than I was.

As I was reflecting on it last night, one name came to mind: William Wilberforce. I thought of how he tirelessly fought against slavery. Year after year after year he toiled, against all odds and with few allies — until finally his battle was was. 

He was one man who helped pave the way that ultimately brought Obama the freedom that allowed him to run for — and win — this high office.

I don’t believe it is a stretch to compare Wilberforce’s efforts to the efforts of those who, for almost 36 years, have been fighting tooth and nail to reverse Roe vs. Wade. His example provides an inspiration to never give up the fight of protecting the innocent from the most heinous of acts. 

Obama will be sworn in on Jan 20. One of the first things he has promised to do is sign the Freedom of Choice Act, which would virtually reverse all restrictions on legalized abortion — all that so many have fought for in 36 years. If I were to guess, I’d say he’s probably planning on doing that on Jan 22 – the anniversary of Roe vs. Wade. 

I didn’t vote for him, but Obama will be my president, and I will be praying for him — that he will have God-given strength and wisdom to lead our nation in the right direction, and that God will change his heart on many issues. (God has the power to do that, you know).

And specifically, I will be praying that as he faces the decision of signing the Freedom of Choice act, that our president will be reminded of William Wilberforce’s fight — and that his eyes will be opened to see his need to follow Wilberforce’s example by fighting for this generation of the most innocent victims: the unborn.

Advertisements

7 responses to “Election Reflections

  1. Nikki,
    Wow, what a great post! Couldn’t agree with you more!

  2. Samantha Arends

    Great post Nikki! You know what i love most about yesterdays outcomes? The same great state that voted for a very liberal president…is the same great state that voted AGAINST gay marriage. I can’t help but feel that it says something (even if only a little something) about our country. There is still HOPE that this country can CHANGE greatly, but i don’t think it’s the same HOPE and CHANGE Obama has in mind 🙂 God’s got something in store for us, and i guess i’ll go along for the ride!

  3. I love your Wilberforce analogy. Very encouraging.

    I have to admit (and I don’t think I am a bigot, hope not anyway) that I have a hard time thinking that Obama’s victory came about “in spite of” the fact that he is bi-racial, but more because he promised people, especially lower income voters, more “stuff”.

    I really wish the first bi-racial president did not support unrestricted killing of pre-born and born, but unwanted babies. It’s so sad.

    Anyway, great post.

    Love,
    Mom

  4. I really like this post, Nikki. You have a very fair viewpoint which I appreciate. I’ve never been driven to my knees more in prayer. And, it’s been so calming. HE’S STILL in control.

    Thanks again for this great post!!!!

  5. Thanks for all your comments!

    And to clarify, I wasn’t by any means trying to give Obama any credit for winning “in spite of” his heritage, and I certainly don’t agree with the reasons most people voted for him. I agree that I think a big reason he won was because he made a lot of big promises to a lot of people!

    …all I was trying to say is that it’s a pretty remarkable thing that America is at a point where it would consider electing an African-American president. 50 years ago, it would have been completely unthinkable.

    It’s like this. If I would have turned on the TV the other night, knowing NOTHING about Obama, and simply saw that an African-American had won the presidency, my first thought would have been “Wow, that’s kind of cool. A milestone in history”.

    My second thought, though, after hearing about his beliefs/politics, would have been “BUMMER”.

    Make sense? It’s kind of hard to explain. This is sort of a porcupine of a topic! 🙂

  6. It’s like this. If I would have turned on the TV the other night, knowing NOTHING about Obama, and simply saw that an African-American had won the presidency, my first thought would have been “Wow, that’s kind of cool. A milestone in history”.

    My second thought, though, after hearing about his beliefs/politics, would have been “BUMMER”.

    Excellent way to put it, Nikki.
    Love you,
    Mom

  7. I think it was not “in spite of” but really more “because of” in a lot of cases. There were a lot of people out there who knew nothing of the issues, didn’t really even care about the issues frankly. But they voted for him because he was African American. He did his best to say that the McCain camp would say he was different and looked different, but McCain never once said that. In fact, none of the Republican groups or other groups that ran ads for McCain mentioned his race at all. Obama and the Democrats were the only ones. So I guess that as much as we’d like to say race doesn’t matter, it obviously still does. It is just as wrong to vote for someone because of race as it is against someone because of race. Or am I wrong?

    Blessings.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s